SSEN Power Distribution: when should I contact them?

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SSEN Power Distribution supplies energy to 3.8 million homes and businesses across central southern England and the north of Scotland.

Last update: November 2020

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SSEN Power Distribution

Scottish and Southern Electricity (SSE) are well known to most energy consumers in Britain. They are one of the UK’s “Big 6” energy suppliers, and along with Scottish Power, E.ON, EDF, Npower and British Gas they supply around 70% of the country’s gas and electricity. But they are more than just an energy supplier. Like Scottish Power, they also generate their own electricity with 2GW of operational onshore wind capacity. What’s more, the Perth-based energy giant also own transmission and distribution networks. Meaning that they may be responsible for getting the energy to your home as well as supplying it.

But what exactly does SSEN Power Distribution do? When and how should you get in contact with them? And what’s the difference between SSEN Distribution and SSEN Transmission? Here we’ll answer all of your questions.

What does SSEN Power Distribution do? What services do they offer?

Scottish and Southern Electricity Networks is a Distribution Network Operator (DNO). They are in charge of overseeing the supply of electricity to homes and businesses in the north of Scotland and central southern England as well as areas like the Shetland Islands and the Isle of Wight.

You can check the National Grid website to see if SSEN is the DNO for your area.

Their primary responsibility is to ensuring a safe and reliable supply of electricity for the 3.8 million domestic and commercial energy consumers across its network. Regardless of which company actually supplies their electricity.

SSEN Distribution employs more than 3,500 people in a range of capacities from engineers to customer service representatives. It also has a responsibility to help create a more renewable and lower carbon energy infrastructure in the areas it serves.

The services they offer include:

  • Power cut and electrical emergency assistance
  • Maintaining the Priority Services Register to ensure that the vulnerable have support when they need it.
  • Maintaining and upgrading the electricity network.
  • Managing and moving connections to the national grid.

SSEN Power Distribution and SSEN Transmission: What’s the difference?

SSEN Power Distribution and SSEN Transmission are both part of SSE. And both are in charge of managing the electricity networks in the areas that they serve.

The difference is that SSEN Transmission owns, and is responsible for maintaining, the 132kV, 275kV and 400kV electricity transmission network in northern Scotland. Its network encompasses almost a quarter of the UK’s land mass and includes all the overhead wooden poles, underground cables, steel towers and electricity substations that share in bringing power to the region.

When should I contact SSEN Power Distribution?

Whether SSE supplies energy to your home or not, if you live in an are where SSEN is your DNO, you’ll need to contact SSEN Power Distribution if you:

Want to connect / disconnect to the national grid

If you’re building, remodelling or demolishing your home, you’ll need to contact SSEN to facilitate your connection or disconnection to the grid. You’ll also need to contact the connections department if you want to create a new EV charge point for your electrical vehicle. Click here to see the connection’s page.

Need to move your electricity meter

If you’re currently making renovations to your home or business premises that require you to move your electricity meter you will need to speak to the SSEN connections team.

Experience an SSEN Power Distribution power cut

If you live or work in an area overseen by SSEN Power Distribution, you may need to contact them if you experience a loss of power. You can report a power cut, get real-time updates on power outages in your area, acquire an Estimated Time of Restoration (ETR) or get general advice on dealing with a power cut by visiting the Power Cuts page on their website.

Want to register yourself or someone else for priority services

A power cut is an annoyance and an inconvenience for all. But for our most vulnerable, it can be far more serious. For those who are reliant on electricity for their medical aids and equipment, a power cut can be debilitating or even life threatening. As such, there will be many who could benefit from placement on the priority services register. While energy consumers on this register cannot be guaranteed an uninterrupted energy supply, SSEN can ensure that the vulnerable get the help they need when they need it.

You should consider signing up to the priority register if you are:

  • Over 60.
  • Have a disability or chronic illness.
  • Are deaf or hard of hearing.
  • Are blind or partially sighted.
  • Use medical age or equipment that rely on electricity.
  • Live with a child under the age of 5.

Registering for priority services allows energy consumers access to:

  • A dedicated 24/7 priority services contact number.
  • Priority updates in the event of a power cut.
  • The ability to nominate someone else (like a relative or care giver) for SSEN to contact on your behalf.
  • Information provided in an appropriate format e.g. Braille or audio.
  • Your own security password.

Click here to complete a simple sign-up form. You can also Click here to chat via a BSL interpreter.

SSEN Power Distribution

SSEN Power distribution contact number

While many may prefer to deal with SSEN via online means, there are many who would prefer to contact them over the phone. In the event of a power cut, for instance, it’s always more reassuring when you’re able to talk to a human being.

As such, here are the relevant contact numbers for SSEN Power Distribution:

  • Call 0800 048 3516 for general enquiries.
  • In an emergency, call 0800 072 7282 in England or 0800 300 999 in Scotland.
  • Call 0800 294 3259 for priority services, or 0800 316 5457 from a text phone.

Wherever you are, a reliable power network is just one piece of the big picture!

SSEN keep the infrastructure that brings energy to your home running. But that’s just one piece of the big picture. No matter who your DNO is, you need to ensure that you’re with the right supplier and on the right tariff for your needs. The right supplier can bring you cheaper, more renewable energy and superior customer service.

But not everyone has time to trawl through the market finding the best deals.

That’s where we come in!

Not only can we scour the market for the best deals to meet your needs, we can also manage your switch from end-to-end, ensuring that you get cheaper, cleaner energy hassle-free.

Sound good?

Call us on 0330 054 0017 to find out more. We’re available from 9am to 7pm.

SSEN Power FAQs

Who owns SSEN Power Distribution?

SSEN Power Distribution are part of Scottish and Southern Electricity (SSE), who in turn are owned by OVO Energy as of January 2020.

How do I report a power cut to SSEN?

You can either visit SSEN’s Power Cuts page or call them on 0800 072 7282 in England or 0800 300 999 in Scotland.

What is SSEN Power Distribution’s contact number?

There are a number of contact numbers for SSEN Power Distribution. As well as the emergency numbers listed above, you can call 0800 048 3516 for general enquiries.

Alternatively, if you wish to sign yourself or someone else up for priority services call 0800 294 3259s, or 0800 316 5457 from a text phone.

Is SSEN a DNO?

Yes, SSEN is a Distribution Network Operator. Check the National Grid website to see if they are the DNO for your area.

Redactor

Written by eleanor

Updated on 25 Nov, 2020

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